Advice

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Can I put my filter in the Dishwasher?

Don’t Rinse Filters in the Dishwasher... It’s very important to remember to not wash your hot tub filters in the dishwasher. Although this may seem like the perfect way to get them clean, it can actually be very harmful to the filters (and to you!). There is always residue that is left from the detergent inside your dishwasher. When this detergent comes in contact with your hot tub filter, it will stick inside the deepest parts of the pleats which will cause very unpleasant foam when you put the filters back in the hot tub. Even running it through a second “rinse only” cycle will not solve this problem. Who wants to eat off of their plates and silverware after they have been run through the same dishwasher that you just cleaned your hot tub filters in? A dirty filter holds dead skin, hair, bacteria, scum, debris and lots of other nasties!
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What Is The Difference Between pH and Alkalinity?

Here is a simple way to understand the difference between pH and total alkalinity: Think of the pH as the thermometer on your furnace's thermostat. The thermometer measures the exact room temperature. If it's a little cooler than you like, you turn the thermostat up. You have just displayed the ability to control the temperature. Total alkalinity is like the thermostat, in that it gives you the ability to control pH. This is why you test and adjust the total alkalinity before even touching your pH test kit. Your goal? To keep total alkalinity readings inside the acceptable range of 80 to 120 PPM. If you suspect your pH level to be a little high, then try for a higher reading of 150 PPM when testing the total alkalinity. Why? Because pH-lowering chemicals will lower the total alkalinity as well. - If your total alkalinity reading is below 80 PPM, then you will use TA Increaser. - If you got a reading above 120 PPM, then pH Reducer is what you will use. Again, to achieve these readings you will need a test kit or test strips.
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What is Biofilm?

Biofilm is a rapidly reproducing colony of microorganisms surrounded by their protective slime in an aqueous environment. They grow on surfaces where water doesn’t flow and prefer environments where water is stagnant and void of sanitizer. In hot tubs, they are often found in the pipes where the water flow has been stopped or dramatically reduced (i.e. diverter valves isolate certain therapy returns, waterfalls where flow has been shut off, etc.). Biofilm is noticeable after water flow is returned to isolated pipes and is ‘blown’ back into the hot tub in the form of floating particulate that appears as tiny pieces of ‘skin’ or torn up pieces of tissue paper. Tip: To prevent the formation of BioFilm, we recommend regularly adding O-Care to your Hot Tub weekly alongside your chosen Sanitiser.
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What is Total Alkalinity?

If you thought pH was important, you were right. But, total alkalinity is even more important. The total alkalinity is the buffer of pH, if it is not balanced correctly, the pH will not give you a correct reading. Total alkalinity is the ability to control pH. Total Alkalinity (TA) is a very important component of overall water balance. Its primary role is to help keep pH in proper balance. The best definition of TA is; “the measure of water’s ability to resist a change in pH.” In other words, once you balance your pH successfully within the range of 7.4 – 7.6, it is TA that helps you keep it there. The secondary role of TA is to assist in providing the overall mineral content that all water requires to prevent unnecessary damage to surfaces. Water low in TA will see the pH bouncing up and down, almost uncontrollably. The spa surfaces will also be at risk of long-term damage due to corrosion, especially vinyl liners. Water high in TA will find the pH constantly high and in need of reducing and a greater risk of scale formation, cloudy water and shorter filter runs. Ideal TA Levels for All Hot Tub Surfaces: 125 – 150 ppm